Exploring Groundhog Day: Screening and Discussion

The Cincinnati Psychoanalytic Institute will hold its annual discussion and screening of the film, Groundhog Day (dir. Harold Ramis, 1993), on Groundhog Day, Friday, February 2, 2008 from 6:30-9:00 p.m. This year marks the 25th anniversary of the release of the film.

Discussion of the film from a psychoanalytic perspective will be facilitated by Peter Kotcher, M.D. and James Thomas, M.D. The screening will take place in the Frederic Kapp Memorial Library at CPI, 3001 Highland Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45219. The cost is $12.

Click here to register for this event.

Groundhog day 2018


UC European Film Festival 2018


The UC European Film Festival begins January 20 at The Mini Microcinema. Our theme is the “Limits of European Cinema” and the selection will feature the latest contemporary films from European festivals and carefully selected classics. Come enjoy Westerns, “Easterns,” documentaries and mockumentaries from all corners of Europe. Screenings will be held at the Mini Microcinema, Esquire and the Cincinnati Art Museum (part of the “Moving Images Series”).

For more information, visit the Facebook page for the Center for Film & Media Studies at the University of Cincinnati:




New Publication in The International Journal of the Literary Humanities


bigclockL’Art Noir: The Perfidy of Images in Film Noir

by Matt Bennett

The International Journal of Literary Humanities, Volume 15, Issue 1, March 2017, pp.9-14.

Abstract: Amidst the hardboiled detectives, doomed protagonists, and femmes fatales in “films noirs,” works of art often operate as characters in their own right, effecting their own double-crossings. Thus far, the presence of art in the mise-en-scene has remained a largely untapped resource in helping to understand these popular American films of the 1940s and 1950s. In this article, I explore the deployment of art in noir as a duplicitous narrative device, with intentions ranging from confusion through deceit to destruction. Art can function to drive the narrative, but can also serve as a canvas upon which characters can project their own fantasies. Art can also be understood as the product of the sublimated sex drive of artist characters appearing in the films. The capacity of images to conceal the truth is fully taken advantage of in noir, and the perfidy of those images is central to the narrative of many of the films.

Where the Wild Things Are


This Friday, June 24, the Association for Psychoanalytic Thought presents Where the Wild Things Are, directed by Spike Jonze based on Maurice Sendak’s book. The screening will be followed by discussion about grief in a dramatic dreamscape by Rachel Zlatkin, Professor of English at NKU, and Alla Baskakova, psychiatrist at VA Medical Center.

Wine and cheese at 6:30. Program starts at 7pm.

Location: Cincinnati Psychoanalytic Institute, 3001 Highland Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45219

Please RSVP: Norman Hirsch, hirschnorman@gmail.com or 513-515-6836.