Where the Wild Things Are

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This Friday, June 24, the Association for Psychoanalytic Thought presents Where the Wild Things Are, directed by Spike Jonze based on Maurice Sendak’s book. The screening will be followed by discussion about grief in a dramatic dreamscape by Rachel Zlatkin, Professor of English at NKU, and Alla Baskakova, psychiatrist at VA Medical Center.

Wine and cheese at 6:30. Program starts at 7pm.

Location: Cincinnati Psychoanalytic Institute, 3001 Highland Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45219

Please RSVP: Norman Hirsch, hirschnorman@gmail.com or 513-515-6836.

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Dada Lives! Opening Reception: Friday, April 29, 5pm

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Dada Lives! is an international exhibition by contemporary Dada-inspired artists from across the United States, and over 20 other nations, conceived to celebrate the centennial of the founding of the Dada movement in 1916. The exhibition’s opening reception is also the publication party for a new, contemporary Dada art and poetry review, MetaDada: The International Journal of Dada Mining, the inaugural issue of which will be published on the 100th anniversary of the first Dada publication, Cabaret Voltaire, which appeared on May 15, 1916.

Please join us for the opening artist reception on Friday, April 29, 2016 from 5-9pm at the UCBA College Art Gallery.

https://www.facebook.com/events/224983567876757/

 

New publication in PsyArt Journal

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Sookie and Symptom, Vampire and Void: Irruption of the Real in True Blood

February 18, 2016 ·

Abstract

Sookie Stackhouse, the protagonist of HBO’s True Blood, is a telepath who has grown up knowing what people “really” think. From the first episode, however, moments suggest we view her character symptomatically—after all, she hears voices in her head. The series then becomes an illustration of Lacanian concepts of subjectivity and the Real. Sookie is a sexually-repressed 24-year-old virgin, molested by her great uncle and left in the care of her grandmother, with whom she still lives after losing both parents. The extimate sexualized voices in her head can be read as a mechanism constructed to cope with traumatic loss and abuse, and to justify her repression. The introduction of vampire Bill Compton signals the irruption of the Real in the Symbolic order. His unreadable mind presents a void upon which to project her fantasies, but their relationship, mirroring that of analyst and analysand, provides a way for Sookie to work through her symptoms.

View the full article here:

http://journal.psyart.org/article/sookie-and-symptom-vampire-and-void-irruption-of-the-real-in-true-blood/

Psychoanalysis as Core Training

active-18975_640Core training has become the gold standard for physical fitness. A strong core has many benefits, from improving balance, stabilizing the back, preventing injury, and even helping us breathe. Core training goes hand in hand with functional training. With a strong core, we can move more easily and capably in life.

Now, knowing that I am a psychoanalyst, maybe you can see where this is going! People often wonder about the aim of psychoanalysis. What is its purpose, what does it do for you, how does it help you in life? I think that psychoanalysis is akin to core training. The help offered is aimed at strengthening us at the core of our psyches. Once strengthened at the core, we become more capable in our psychological, emotional, and relational lives…

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/headshrinkers-guide-the-galaxy/201603/psychoanalysis-core-training

Jennifer Kunst – Psychology Today

At home with Sigmund Freud – the father of psychoanalysis

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Sigmund Freud, the father of psycho­analysis, remains a great thinker still needed in a troubled world some 77 years after his death at the house in Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead, now the Freud Museum, which celebrates its 30th anniversary in July.

While many local residents are unaware that this is where Freud lived when he escaped from Nazi-occupied Austria in 1938, his reputation remains international and the house is one of London’s best historic centres of excellence in research and education at the cutting edge. Some 28,000 people visited the museum last year. There were those who have concerns about mental health, as well as some visibly moved at the sight of Freud’s famous couch while others take comfort sitting on a replica, specially provided…

http://www.camdenreview.com/node/991484

Gerald Isaaman – Camden Review

Psi episode 4, “Believing in the Afterlife”

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On Friday, January 22nd, the Association for Psychoanalytic Thought screened an episode of the Brazilian television series, Psi, about a psychoanalyst, Carlo Antonini, his family, and his practice in São Paulo. The series is co-written by Contardo Calligaris, a well-known Italian psychoanalyst, novelist, and playwright who lives and works in Brazil. The episode screened involved a patient, Milton, who believes his dead wife is communicating with him from beyond the grave. Leading discussion of the episode were Dr. Natalia Jacovkis, Associate Professor of Spanish at Xavier University and specialist in film and media studies, and Dr. Karl Stuckenberg, Chair of Xavier’s School of Psychology.

Dr. Jacovkis introduced the screening by explaining the production environment for television in Brazil, where big-budgets and leading actors contribute to quality television programming, outshining even film production. This was well-evidenced with Psi, which is a finely-crafted, thought-provoking, and superbly-written piece of entertainment. Much of the narrative impact of the episode is created by several subplots that are tightly-integrated with the main storyline, one following Antonini’s sessions with another patient whose brother and nephew died in a car crash and a second focused on the death of his daughter’s dog. The multiple storylines involving death and mourning work together to create a thematic unity missing in much mainstream American television.

The loneliness and isolation characters experience in the metropolis of São Paulo is another striking aspect of the series, pointed out by Dr. Jacovkis. The severe, austerely-depicted city provides Dr. Antonini with a steady clientele of troubled psychoanalytic patients, but he, too, is troubled. He maintains a predominantly sterile and clinical demeanor in his interpersonal relationships, not only with clients, but also with his ex-wife and children. However, he is warm and genial with his colleagues, showing a likable side to the good doctor. In general, all the characters are complex and multidimensional, important to a series concerned with the human psyche.

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It is toward that human psyche that Dr. Stuckenberg steered the discussion after the screening, when he invoked Freud’s essay on “Mourning and Melancholia” as a lens through which to understand Milton’s delusions. Overwhelming guilt and anger are attendant with his grief, but when Milton confesses to having killed his wife’s dogs, Dr. Antonini identifies his confession as too detailed, too rehearsed. This causes Milton to erupt in an uncalculated tirade involving everything that he hated about his wife, from her telling pointless stories to smelling bad “down there.” By the end of the episode, the purgation of Milton’s feelings of anger and hatred toward his dead wife provides him with some relief, but there is still much work to be done. Ultimately, as noted by Dr. Stuckenberg in closing the discussion, it matters not whether the ghosts of our loved ones are real or imagined; we must still process our own conscious and repressed feelings toward those loved ones in order to exorcise their spirits.

Spring Psychoanalytic Poetry Festival

Presented in association with The Freud Museum – London

Freud Museum Logo

Saturday 12 March 2016, 9:30 am5:00 pm

Word & Image

In talks, readings and conversations, speakers from the worlds of poetry, film and psychoanalysis explore the power of images in memory, imagination and poetry. How is an image re-rendered in a poem, and how might perception be influenced by the poet’s internal world?

Sessions include:

Gerry Byrne on the transformational power of words and images in poetry and psychotherapy.
Valerie Sinason on the language of trauma and dissociation.
Mark Solms on ‘The Mind of the Artist’.
Eliza Kentridge, poet and artist, reading from and introducing Signs for an Exhibition, and in conversation with Mark Solms.
PoetryFilms selected by Zata Banks and introduced by the filmmakers themselves.
Maurice Riordan with a ‘poem on the couch’, conducting an in-depth analysis of a single poem, ‘Santarém’ by Elizabeth Bishop.
Pascale Petit on ‘Pained Hearts and Painted Sorrows’; how imagery and images filter pain; exploring the creative dialogue she has developed with the work of Frida Kahlo.

Tickets

£62 full / £46 concs (with £5 off for members of Freud Museum and/or The Poetry Society)

Booking now open. Visit the Freud Museum’s Eventbrite to buy your tickets.

Speakers

Gerry Byrne is a consultant nurse and child and adolescent psychotherapist, working in the NHS and privately in Oxford. He is clinical lead for the Family Assessment and Safeguarding Service (Oxon, Wilts and BaNES) and the Infant Parent Perinatal Service (Oxon). With two colleagues he runs the annual Children in Troubled Worlds conference which promotes the contributions psychoanalytic thinking and the arts can make to work with troubled children and with Janet Bolam, theatre director and writer, he runs Between the Lines – Writers and Psychotherapists in Conversation. www.bolamandbyrne.co.uk

Valerie Sinason is a poet, author, child and adult psychotherapist and adult psychoanalyst. She is Director of the Clinic for Dissociative Studies in London and Honorary Consultant Psychotherapist to the Cape Town Child Guidance Unit.

Mark Solms is Director of Neuropsychology at the University of Cape Town. He is a member of the British, American and South African Psychoanalytical Associations, and has won many awards, including the Sigourney Prize. He has published over 300 articles and six books. He is editor and translator of the forthcoming Revised Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (24 vols) and the Complete Neuroscientific Works of Sigmund Freud (4 vols).

Eliza Kentridge was born in Johannesburg in 1962. She moved to England in the late 1980s and has lived in Essex for the past 25 years. She is an artist who works in many media, though she is primarily known for her stitched drawings and applique flags. Her literary leanings, evident since childhood, now result in her first book of poetry: Signs For An Exhibition

Maurice Riordan’s poetry collections include The Water Stealer (Faber, 2013) and The Holy Land (Faber, 2007). He has recently edited The Finest Music: Early Irish Lyrics (Faber, 2014). He is Professor of Poetry at Sheffield Hallam University and the editor of The Poetry Review.

Pascale Petit is a poet living in Cornwall. Her sixth collection Fauverie was shortlisted for the 2014 T S Eliot Prize, poems from it won the 2013 Manchester Poetry Prize. Her fifth collection What the Water Gave Me: Poems after Frida Kahlo was shortlisted for both the T S Eliot Prize and Wales Book of the Year, and was a Book of the Year in the Observer. Pascale has had four collections shortlisted for the T S Eliot Prize and chosen as Books of the Year in the Times Literary Supplement, Independent and Observer. She is the recipient of a Cholmondeley Award. Bloodaxe will publish her seventh collection Mama Amazonica in 2017.

PoetryFilm is the highly influential research art project founded by British artist Zata Banks in 2002, celebrating poetry films and other experimental text/image/sound material. Since 2002, PoetryFilm has presented over 70 events at venues including Tate Britain, ICA, FACT Liverpool, Cannes Film Festival, CCCB Barcelona, O Miami, The Royal College of Art, and Curzon Cinemas. Zata Banks has also judged poetry film prizes for the Southbank Centre in London, Zebra Festival in Berlin, and Carbon Culture Review in America. PoetryFilm is supported by Arts Council England, and is an accredited member of Film Hub London, part of the BFI Audience Network. The PoetryFilm Archive, which at present contains about a thousand artworks, welcomes submissions all year round.

The Psychoanalysis of Politicians Like Donald Trump

Could the success of politicians like Donald Trump be the result of psychology?

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Donald Trump’s extraordinary success represents a political paradox to many opponents who reject what they perceive as his extremist xenophobic, simplistic politics. Critics continue to be perplexed as to why the richest man to run for President, attracts such passionate support from the poorest white constituency.

Or are politicians like Donald Trump simply more astute psychologists than their rivals?

Jay Frankel, from the Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, at New York University, and the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, has recently published a paper entitled ‘The traumatic basis for the resurgence of right-wing politics among working Americans’….

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/slightly-blighty/201601/the-psychoanalysis-politicians-donald-trump

Raj Persaud, M.D. and Peter Bruggen, M.D. – Psychology Today

When Freud Meets fMRI

The emerging field of “neuropsychoanalysis” aims to combine two fundamentally different areas of study—psychoanalysis and neuroscience—for a whole new way of understanding how the mind works.

I am in an apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, surrounded by psychoanalysts. At moments, if I half close my eyes, I can imagine I’m in some European city, circa 1930: “The Kleinians have this very disturbing, I think, notion of countertransference as being something the patient does to you. They’re moving too far away from Freud’s understanding…” But in fact it’s 2010, and the conversation is new…

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/08/neuroscience-psychoanalysis-casey-schwartz-mind-fields/401999/

Casey Schwartz – The Atlantic